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Many Franchises Offer Discounts and Training
CNBC.com | March 23, 2012 | 11:43 AM EDT

Will Kosnitch was a sergeant in the U.S. Army with three tours of Iraq under his belt, a specialty as a Black Hawk mechanic, and a plan to make the military his career.

Until a bad back got in the way.

With a medical discharge in the works, Kosnitch, 35, was panicked at the prospect of looking for a job.

“I had been in Army almost 12 years; it’s hard to know anything else,” he told CNBC.com. “At first I thought I’d look for jobs working on aircraft, something I have experience in.”

Kosnitch considered opening a bar or restaurant. “I wanted to be my own boss. I had worked hard in the Army, moving from private to sergeant; I didn’t want to go back to the bottom rung on the ladder.”

Then he saw an ad for Snap-on Tools, the Kenosha, Wis., company that operates 4,200 franchises worldwide — and suddenly it all came together.

“We used Snap-on in the Army, so I knew Snap-on’s reputation in the field,” he said. “And before the Army, I was an auto mechanic. Then I saw the deal they were giving veterans, and it was a no-brainer.”

The total investment necessary to begin operation of a Snap-on standard franchise will range from $146,783 to $295,796, including inventory, according to Snap-on. The Veterans Discount provides a $20,000 discount on the initial inventory.

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