Real-Time Quote
Page 3 of 5 | Prev Page | Next Page
Show Entire Article

Still an Uphill Battle
CNBC.com | October 10, 2011 | 11:31 AM EDT

What’s most frustrating to gender-equity advocates about the stagnant, low numbers is the growing body of research that shows diverse management teams produce better financial results than all-male teams.

Soon cited Catalyst’s groundbreaking 2004 report, “The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity,” which concluded that companies with the greatest gender diversity at the top had an average 35 percent better return on equity and 34 percent better total return to shareholders than companies with the least gender diversity at the top.

Catalyst’s 2007 report, “The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Women’s Representation on Boards” reached similar conclusions, Soon said.

A recent study by the McKinsey management consulting firm found that companies with three or more women in senior management positions score more highly on nine organizational excellence criteria than companies with no women at the top.

It makes perfect sense if you think about it, according to Skaggs.

“Women bring different perspective to the playing field, which often helps bottom line,” she says. “They bring different problem solving strategies, different networks offer different opportunities to companies.”

Page 3 of 5 | Prev Page | Next Page
Show Entire Article
More

Real-Time Quote
omniture pixel